Nobbys Oral History

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Nobbys Sandstorm - photo courtesy Beryl Atkins


The project is being conducted in recognition of the heritage significance of Nobbys headland and lighthouse and its importance and place in the Newcastle story.

It provides an opportunity to record the memories and stories of the people who lived and worked at the Lighthouse and Signal Station on the headland.

Stories collected will be included in Newcastle Museum’s social history collection and may be used to record in an audio trail of the buildings and site of Nobbys Lighthouse, Macquarie Pier, breakwater and the entrance to the Hunter River.

The project is being conducted in recognition of the heritage significance of Nobbys headland and lighthouse and its importance and place in the Newcastle story.

It provides an opportunity to record the memories and stories of the people who lived and worked at the Lighthouse and Signal Station on the headland.

Stories collected will be included in Newcastle Museum’s social history collection and may be used to record in an audio trail of the buildings and site of Nobbys Lighthouse, Macquarie Pier, breakwater and the entrance to the Hunter River.

If you have a connection to Nobbys headland and would like to share your story please contact the Museum's Public Program Manager on 02 4974 1412 or dhampton@ncc.nsw.gov.au


David Murgatroyd was a young man when his parents and younger sisters moved into Cottage No 3 at Nobbys in 1985.  As a young seafarer, David was in a position to appreciate the importance of his father’s role of signalman and the cottage provided a unique base for David to ‘drop his bags’ when on leave.



 




Ann Rzechowicz was 9 years old when she moved to Nobbys with her parents in 1974 shortly before the storm that wrecked the Sygna on Stockton Beach.




 


Beryl Atkins started Kindergarten at Newcastle East Public School (in Bolton Street in those days) shortly after her father took up a position as Nobbys Assistant Signalman at the end of World War 2.  Beryl spent all her school years living in Cottage Number 3 before leaving home to get married in 1958.  She recalls the pastimes for children living on the headland and some of the hazzards of getting to school in windy weather.




 

Listen to some of the stories we've already collected

The Coast Watchers

Beryl Atkins

David Murgatroyd

 

Signal Station Upgrade

Beryl Atkins

 

Life at Nobbys

Beryl Atkins

Beryl Atkins

David Murgatroyd

 

The Maianbar

Ann Rzechowicz